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Welcome our new holistic nutritionist, Carina Parikh

3 Jul
Holistic Nutritionist, Carina Parikh,  MScN, MSiMR

Holistic Nutritionist, Carina Parikh, MScN, MSiMR

Carina Parikh, MScN, MSiMR is joining the practice July 13th as our new Holistic Nutritionist. We are so excited to have Carina! She holds a Masters of Science in Nutrition and a Masters of Science in Integrative Medicine Research from National College of Natural Medicine – an accredited Medical School in Naturopathic and Classical Chinese Medicine located in Portland, Oregon.

Needless to say, Carina knows healthy food in a really deep wayCarina will be available for highly tailored meal planning via in-office Nutritional Counseling Visits, in-home Pantry Clean Outs as well as Guided Grocery Shopping Visits with you at your local Dallas area Whole Foods, Central Market, or Green Grocer.

As always, we appreciate you inviting us on your personal health journey and we’ll see you soon!

An Open Letter to Sheryl Sandberg From Dr. Kate Naumes ND

8 May

Open Letter Sheryul Sandberg

Dear Sheryl,

I enjoyed the letter that Alexandra Chang wrote to you in the latest issue of WIRED – it has inspired me to write one of my own. I want to tell you what I think about your enlightening new book urging women not to shy away from ambition and leadership. But first, a little bit about why I’m writing you…

Since my teenage years, I’ve felt strongly that women had something particular to contribute to a healthier world. For my undergraduate studies, I choose Mount Holyoke College – a beautiful, rural all women’s college – in hopes of finding role models that would inspire, create, and contribute to a more feminine world. I hoped these role models could help me figure out how to find the freedom to be my best self and support other women to do the same. While studying Biochemistry didn’t exactly get me any closer to that goal, it was a part of my path to naturopathic medical school and midwifery, where it seemed I’d finally found a feminine paradigm for medicine that supported women to be free of the beliefs that don’t promote self-love.

Now that I’ve just finished reading your book, Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead, I must say that I’m heartened by many of your suggestions and glad to see you open up a new chapter in the ongoing conversation about women, work, and family.  As you point out, thirty years after women became 50 percent of the college graduates in the United States, men still hold the vast majority of leadership positions in government and industry. And so, I think it’s important that you are encouraging women to “sit at the table,” to seek challenges, take risks, and pursue their goals.

That said, I don’t think it’s enough to offer strategies for women to better succeed mostly by acting like men in a man’s world. Rather, for women to be better represented in government, higher education, corporate boardrooms, and public life, I think we need to reimagine what work looks like.

Read the rest of Dr. Naumes’ letter over at DMoms Blog.

Cultivating Female Friendships Amidst Crazy Schedules

26 Feb

Cultivating Female Friendships

 

At the end of last year I wrote about the health benefits that friendships and a rich social life confer. This week I want to brainstorm how to cultivate female friendships amidst our full lives. Now, I love my husband, but as evolved as he may often show himself to be, there are some needs he is simply never going to fulfill (among them, stylist, professional back-rubber, and home-organizer). Since the joys of parenthood and running a household don’t always  allow for ample girl time, I think it’s necessary to get creative and intentional to make sure it happens!

See a few of Dr. Naumes’ ideas in her post over at D-Magazines DMoms Blog to get you started.

Finding the Elusive Balance

12 Feb

Finding Elusive Balance

Amidst our hyper-busy, multi-tasking urban lifestyle, I’m often asked about finding balance in one’s life. The art of saying “no” (which I like to reframe as the art of saying “Yes!”) starts with organizing your big picture around what’s truly important to you and your family, long-term. Here are four specific ways to do this.
  1. Make a family mission statement – A strong mission statement can drive every other decision that your family makes. If you and your partner can agree on your mutual mission, you may find that assuming this bird’s eye view of life helps you decide what is worth pursuing and what to set aside. Look at your primary relationships and take care that your actions support each other rather than push your family members away from one another. From time-to-time, my husband and I get out our family mission statement to use as a litmus test – we want to see if we are being true to vision. Then we try to let go of everything that’s not of vital importance.

Read more of Dr. Naumes’ post over at D-Magazines DMoms Blog

Tips for Staying Sane During the Holidays

20 Nov

Managing stress is one of the most important things you can do for the health and well-being of yourself and your family. My #1 tip is to take on less! Keep life simple and don’t compare yourself to others. The fall and winter are darker, slower times for rest and reflection; the holidays should be enjoyable and relaxing.

Tips for keeping life simple:

  • Take time for introspection and give children a break from activities, research shows that unstructured play time is vital to development and creativity.
  • You can stay stylish and keep it simple with a mom “uniform.” Or build your wardrobe around a simple color palette so that everything you pull out of your closet already matches. (Your husband will appreciate the break from having to be your stylist.)
  • Learn to say no to holiday parties and get-togethers that don’t bring you and your family joy and peace and that aren’t true obligations.

 

Ok, so you’re just going to have a busy fall and holiday season… no way around it. What can you do to stay energized and sane? How can you manage your stress?

Read more of Dr. Naumes’ post over at D-Magazine’s D-Moms Blog

Have you wondered whether Naturopathic Care is a good investment?

13 Sep

The Scientific Affairs Committee of the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians compiled data and released the following paper earlier this year:

Naturopathic Medicine:
A Key Part to Healing the Nation’s Financial Health Care Crisis

Increasing levels of chronic disease including: diabetes, heart disease, chronic pain, cancer and obesity, have created a multi-trillion dollar financial burden on the medical system. Naturopathic medicine may reduce the need for expensive conventional care by promoting health and decreasing the need for medical interventions over the long term.  Naturopathic doctors are primary care providers that treat acute and chronic conditions as well as address health promotion and disease prevention.

Naturopathic medicine costs less than conventional care.

  • Use of natural health products has the potential to improve health outcomes and reduce cost compared to conventional treatment by anywhere from 3.7- 73%. (1)
  • A 2006 University of Washington study found that in WA State, naturopathic care cost insurers $9.00 per enrollee vs. $686.00 for conventional care. (2)
  • Manual therapy cost less than primary care for neck pain and decreases recovery time, thereby also improving productivity. (3)
  • One year of a lifestyle intervention program (similar to that recommended by naturopathic physicians) for patients with coronary artery disease not only improved all health outcomes and reduced the need for surgery but also cost significantly less then conventional treatment ($7,000 vs $31,000 –$46,000). (4)
  • Naturopathic care, when used for reduction of cardiovascular risk factors (high blood pressure and cholesterol, for example) improved health and increased job productivity, and was determined to actually be a cost-saver for an employer. (5)
  • Naturopathic care used for chronic low back pain, not only cost less than a standard physical therapy regimen but also decreased absenteeism by up to 7 days in a worker’s year. (6)

Naturopathic medicine decreases the need for medical interventions by improving patient wellbeing, preventing disease and treating disease by improving health.

  • The naturopathic emphasis on prevention and health promotion saves lives and dollars. Lifestyle modification counseling prevented more cases of diabetes than drug treatment. (7)
  • It is estimated that if the current level of medical intervention continues the US will end up spending $9.5 trillion dollars over the next 30 years caring for cardiovascular disease, diabetes and congestive heart disease alone. By adding preventive strategies to improve patients’ health, total cost could be reduced approx. $904 billion or almost 10%. (8)
  • Although the initial cost of prevention and treatment using natural medicine is sometimes similar to conventional care the benefits gained by avoiding disease and their associated costs are invaluable and much preferred by patients. (9)
  • Patients who received intensive lifestyle modification and naturopathic therapy for type II diabetes improved all health scores (lipid levels, body fat percentage, etc.) and decreased medication requirements compared to those on standard therapy, in just one year. (10)

The use of naturopathic medicine decreases total medical expenditure.

  • Total expenditure on health care by insured complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) users is less than non-CAM users ($3,797 vs $4,153); this is an approximate $9.4 million saving for just 26,466 CAM-users (11)
  • Patients with the greatest disease burden, which tend to be the most expensive patients, show the most significant reduction in total medical expenditures when utilizing CAM.(12)
  • Naturopathic doctors are the bridge between alternative and conventional care and model true integrative care. Patients who receive care from an integrative primary care physician have reduced medical costs and need of medical intervention when compared to those receiving conventional primary care. (11)
  • Naturopathic care in Canada reduces the use of prescription medications by 53%. (13)
  • Reduction in drug prescriptions (61% less) and use of conventional medical care (55% less) are substantial among CAM users. (14)

References

  1. Kennedy, Deborah A. et al. Cost Effectiveness of Natural Health Products: A Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials. eCAM 2009; 6(3) 297-304 (5).
  2. Lafferty WE, et al. Insurance Coverage and Subsequent Utilization of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Providers. Am J Manag Care 2006; 12(7): 397-404 (7).
  3. Korthals-de Bos, Ingeborg B. C. Cost Effectiveness of Physiotherapy, Manual Therapy, and General Practitioner Care For Neck Pain: Economic Evaluation Alongside A Randomised Control Trial. BMJ 2005; 326: 911-917.
  4. Ornish, Dean. Avoiding Revascularization with Lifestyle Changes: The Multicenter Lifestyle Demonstration Project. Am J Cardiol 1998;82:72T–76T.
  5. Seely D, Herman P. Presented at 2010 AANP Conference. Model Whole Practice Study Finds Naturopathic Care Effective, Cost Saving for Canadian Employer. Unpublished. http://theintegratorblog.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=682&Itemid=189
  6. Herman PM, Szczurko O, Cooley K, Mills EJ. Cost-effectiveness of naturopathic care for chronic low back pain. Altern Ther Health Med. 2008 Mar-Apr;14(2):32-9.
  7. Williamson DF. Primary prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus by lifestyle intervention: implications for health policy. Ann Intern Med 2004; 140(11):951-7.
  8. Kahn, Richard. The Impact of Prevention on Reducing the Burden of Cardiovascular Disease. Circulation 2008, 118:576-585.
  9. Woolf, Steeve.  A Closer Look at the Economic Argument for Disease Prevention. JAMA 2009; 301 (5) 356-3.
  10. Hernan WH. Costs associated with the primary prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the diabetes prevention program. Diabetes Care. 2003; 26(1):36-47.
  11. Lind, Bonnie K. et al: Comparison of Health Care Expenditures Among Insured Users and Nonusers of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Washington State: A Cost Minimization Analysis. J Alternative and Complementary Med 2010; 16: 411-417.
  12. Sarnat, Richard L.  et al. Clinical Utilization and Cost Outcomes From and Integrative Medicine Independent Physician Association: An Additional 3- Year Update. J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2007; 30: 263-269.
  13. http://www.ccnm.edu/sites/ccnm/files/pdfs/news_events/press_releases/attitudes_towards.pdf
  14. Stewart D. Utilization, Patient Satisfaction, and Cost Implications of Acupuncture, Massage, and Naturopathic Medicine As Covered Health Benefits; A Comparison of Two Delivery Models. Alternative Therapies in Health & Med. 2001.

DISCLAIMER: Dr. Kate Naumes holds a Doctorate in Naturopathy and a Certificate in Midwifery from Bastyr University. The state of Texas does not license Naturopathic Doctors. As such, she holds her license in California and acts in Texas as a wellness consultant, not as a physician.

Healthy & Easy Finger-Foods for Toddlers

8 Sep

This is a list of my favorite foods that I have been feeding my, almost-13-month-old, son.  I hope you find them helpful.

All Organic, All Easy, All Gluten-Free:

1.  Steamed Carrots
2.  Baked Sweet Potato with Coconut Butter
3.  Free-Range Chicken from Urban Acres, Broccoli, Brown Rice with Wheat-free Tamari and Sesame Oil
4.  Sautéed Zucchini and Squash
5.  2 Egg Yolks (just the yellow part!), fried with pepper
6.  Purple Cabbage sautéed with Ginger and Wheat-free Tamari
7.  Steamed Beets
8.  Bite-sized banana, watermellon, cantelope, and peaches
9.  Apple Sauce with Triple Berry Probiotic Therapeutic Foods
10.  Nitschke Natural ground beef with cumin & coriander

More about my food philosophy

Quick, Effective Workouts

10 May

photo by Smabs Sputzer

Once my infant started sleeping through the night on a regular basis, I decided it was time to focus on regaining my pre-pregnancy strength and cardiovascular fitness. I can’t find the time to get to the gym right now and enjoy spending the extra time I do have with my son. So I searched high and low for workouts I could do at home, in the office, or outside with my child in tow.  I knew that I wanted something that didn’t require much equipment and these workouts require only a few dumbbells. With a combination of nutrition, exercise, visualization, and supplementation I find I’m feeling better and better each day.  Now I’m excited to be offering the following 6-packs to my clients!

What Type of Exercises Can You Expect?

The workouts I’m using are “circuit training” style, which is a system of exercising that maximizes fat-burning and cardiovascular training by keeping the heart rate and breathing up throughout the workout. Circuits are designed for maximum results in the least amount of time by moving from one exercise to the next with little rest in between. When you finish one complete round of the circuit, you begin again at the first exercise, until the specified time is up; in this case 15 minutes per circuit.

I hope you will enjoy them as much as I am.

Mint

5 Apr


I’m David, and I copyedit this website for my wife, Kate. We have a rabbit named Bunners and a baby on the way. We’re learning just how stressful it can be to get ready for a new mouth to feed and the changes in our work schedules that our new little one will bring. We started using Mint.com a little over a year ago, and it’s been a really easy (and free) way to make a budget, see where all our money is going and evaluate what changes we can make. All the colors and charts kinda make it like a video game I don’t feel guilty playing!

I’m currently listening to: Rafter – Animal Feelings

Hello world!

4 Apr

Hello Mommies. How can you set up your life in a way that is joyful, productive, relaxing and meaningful? It was hard enough before baby #1 came into the world, now things can only be more hectic, right? Right?