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Gaia – Coming Soon!

8 Jul

Gaia Creations

Coming soon!  Gaia bag made exclusively for Dr. Naumes Holistic wellness clients.  Gaia creations are handmade with care by women in need in the Dallas, TX area, using vintage, repurposed, or sustainable materials.

Local Healthy Food Field Trip in Dallas!

24 Jun

yummy salad

A valued and long term client shared the following invaluable information with us. Please enjoy!

Years ago, I remember visiting Central Market for the first time and feeling intimidated to see such a variety of unfamiliar food.  This experience sparked an interest in visting a number of local farmer’s markets, and really learning about ingredients and where our food comes from. Nearly a decade has passed and I still love discovering new ingredients and visiting with local farmers who have a passion for the food they offer.
On a recent trip to Hood River, Oregon, my wife and I enjoyed a day touring a local “Fruit Loop” which included a number of local farms.  The drive included farms with apples, cherries and peaches in season, a lavender farm, and an alpaca farm/yarn shop where they breed Alpacas and sell handspun yarn from the fleece.
In that spirit, I’d like to share a few destinations local to the North Dallas area that would make for a fun “food field trip” one Saturday. You’ll want to bring along an ice chest!
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Start in Plano at the Lucky Layla Farm store at Lavon Farms.  Discover raw, unpasteurized cow’s milk, drinkable yogurts, handcrafted cheeses, butter and caramel milk.
Lavon Farms: http://www.lavonfarms.com, 3721 N. Jupiter Rd
Mon-Sat 9-6, 972-423-8080
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Continue North to McKinney to visit Matt at Local Yocal and discover Wagyu steak at its best! Consider signing up for a Steak 101 class to learn where the various cuts of steak come from, how meat is aged, and best of all how to cook it to perfection yourself!  Come hungry for lunch because in the class you’ll sample each cut of steak cooked with wood charcoal on an outdoor pit.
Local Yocal: http://www.localyocalfarmtomarket.com, 213 N Tennessee St.
Mon-Sat 8-6, 469-952-3838
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From McKinney, find FM-543/Weston Rd off of US-75 and enjoy the drive to Weston, Texas, the oldest town in Collin County. Visit Steve at Texas Range Honey for a taste of raw unfiltered varietal honeys and farm fresh eggs. Steve is very passionate about both honey and his chickens!
Texas Range Honey: http://rangehoney.com, 116 Main Street
Saturdays 9am-1pm972-567-2542
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The final stop to Hidden Valley Dairy in Argyle is quite a bit of a drive, though a very scenic one. From Weston, go north on FM-543 and make a left on FM-455. Follow FM-455 across Lake Ray Roberts spillway to I-35. Take I-35 south and follow the split to the right, I-35W and take Crawford Road/Robson Ranch Road exit, turn left, go under I-35W, and take the first right onto Taylor Road. At the end of Taylor Road, turn Left on Old Justin Road. Hidden Valley Dairy will be on your left. Trey & Judy’s specialty is raw goat’s milk, including a wide variety of scented goat milk products that Judy makes herself.  They often have a number of other local and seasonal offerings you may be interested in.  Make sure to check out the goats while you’re there!
Hidden Valley Dairy: http://www.hiddenvalleydairy.com, 402 Old Justin Rd.
M-W-F 10:30am-6:00pm, Sat 12:00-6:00pm469-442-7775
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We love supporting local farmers, and we’re sure there’s a lot more out there to discover.  We hope you’ll check these farmers out, and if there are others you’d like to share please let us know and we’ll pay them a visit!

Invisible Documentary Viewing

19 Aug

invisible documentary viewing

 

In one of the most genius ideas of the summer, our D Moms Daily wellness expert Dr. Kate Naumes, ND has launched a monthly documentary viewing series at her office on the Katy Trail.

The next viewing takes place this Saturday, August 24 at 6 p.m. featuring Invisible, filmmaker Roz Mortimer’s beautiful and thought-provoking film that follows Inuit mothers and the challenges they face as harmful chemicals from their food begin to surface in their breast milk.

Space for the viewing is limited, so be sure to RSVP to frontdesk.naumes.nd@gmail.com if you’re planning to attend!

An Open Letter to Sheryl Sandberg From Dr. Kate Naumes ND

8 May

Open Letter Sheryul Sandberg

Dear Sheryl,

I enjoyed the letter that Alexandra Chang wrote to you in the latest issue of WIRED – it has inspired me to write one of my own. I want to tell you what I think about your enlightening new book urging women not to shy away from ambition and leadership. But first, a little bit about why I’m writing you…

Since my teenage years, I’ve felt strongly that women had something particular to contribute to a healthier world. For my undergraduate studies, I choose Mount Holyoke College – a beautiful, rural all women’s college – in hopes of finding role models that would inspire, create, and contribute to a more feminine world. I hoped these role models could help me figure out how to find the freedom to be my best self and support other women to do the same. While studying Biochemistry didn’t exactly get me any closer to that goal, it was a part of my path to naturopathic medical school and midwifery, where it seemed I’d finally found a feminine paradigm for medicine that supported women to be free of the beliefs that don’t promote self-love.

Now that I’ve just finished reading your book, Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead, I must say that I’m heartened by many of your suggestions and glad to see you open up a new chapter in the ongoing conversation about women, work, and family.  As you point out, thirty years after women became 50 percent of the college graduates in the United States, men still hold the vast majority of leadership positions in government and industry. And so, I think it’s important that you are encouraging women to “sit at the table,” to seek challenges, take risks, and pursue their goals.

That said, I don’t think it’s enough to offer strategies for women to better succeed mostly by acting like men in a man’s world. Rather, for women to be better represented in government, higher education, corporate boardrooms, and public life, I think we need to reimagine what work looks like.

Read the rest of Dr. Naumes’ letter over at DMoms Blog.

Have you wondered whether Naturopathic Care is a good investment?

13 Sep

The Scientific Affairs Committee of the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians compiled data and released the following paper earlier this year:

Naturopathic Medicine:
A Key Part to Healing the Nation’s Financial Health Care Crisis

Increasing levels of chronic disease including: diabetes, heart disease, chronic pain, cancer and obesity, have created a multi-trillion dollar financial burden on the medical system. Naturopathic medicine may reduce the need for expensive conventional care by promoting health and decreasing the need for medical interventions over the long term.  Naturopathic doctors are primary care providers that treat acute and chronic conditions as well as address health promotion and disease prevention.

Naturopathic medicine costs less than conventional care.

  • Use of natural health products has the potential to improve health outcomes and reduce cost compared to conventional treatment by anywhere from 3.7- 73%. (1)
  • A 2006 University of Washington study found that in WA State, naturopathic care cost insurers $9.00 per enrollee vs. $686.00 for conventional care. (2)
  • Manual therapy cost less than primary care for neck pain and decreases recovery time, thereby also improving productivity. (3)
  • One year of a lifestyle intervention program (similar to that recommended by naturopathic physicians) for patients with coronary artery disease not only improved all health outcomes and reduced the need for surgery but also cost significantly less then conventional treatment ($7,000 vs $31,000 –$46,000). (4)
  • Naturopathic care, when used for reduction of cardiovascular risk factors (high blood pressure and cholesterol, for example) improved health and increased job productivity, and was determined to actually be a cost-saver for an employer. (5)
  • Naturopathic care used for chronic low back pain, not only cost less than a standard physical therapy regimen but also decreased absenteeism by up to 7 days in a worker’s year. (6)

Naturopathic medicine decreases the need for medical interventions by improving patient wellbeing, preventing disease and treating disease by improving health.

  • The naturopathic emphasis on prevention and health promotion saves lives and dollars. Lifestyle modification counseling prevented more cases of diabetes than drug treatment. (7)
  • It is estimated that if the current level of medical intervention continues the US will end up spending $9.5 trillion dollars over the next 30 years caring for cardiovascular disease, diabetes and congestive heart disease alone. By adding preventive strategies to improve patients’ health, total cost could be reduced approx. $904 billion or almost 10%. (8)
  • Although the initial cost of prevention and treatment using natural medicine is sometimes similar to conventional care the benefits gained by avoiding disease and their associated costs are invaluable and much preferred by patients. (9)
  • Patients who received intensive lifestyle modification and naturopathic therapy for type II diabetes improved all health scores (lipid levels, body fat percentage, etc.) and decreased medication requirements compared to those on standard therapy, in just one year. (10)

The use of naturopathic medicine decreases total medical expenditure.

  • Total expenditure on health care by insured complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) users is less than non-CAM users ($3,797 vs $4,153); this is an approximate $9.4 million saving for just 26,466 CAM-users (11)
  • Patients with the greatest disease burden, which tend to be the most expensive patients, show the most significant reduction in total medical expenditures when utilizing CAM.(12)
  • Naturopathic doctors are the bridge between alternative and conventional care and model true integrative care. Patients who receive care from an integrative primary care physician have reduced medical costs and need of medical intervention when compared to those receiving conventional primary care. (11)
  • Naturopathic care in Canada reduces the use of prescription medications by 53%. (13)
  • Reduction in drug prescriptions (61% less) and use of conventional medical care (55% less) are substantial among CAM users. (14)

References

  1. Kennedy, Deborah A. et al. Cost Effectiveness of Natural Health Products: A Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials. eCAM 2009; 6(3) 297-304 (5).
  2. Lafferty WE, et al. Insurance Coverage and Subsequent Utilization of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Providers. Am J Manag Care 2006; 12(7): 397-404 (7).
  3. Korthals-de Bos, Ingeborg B. C. Cost Effectiveness of Physiotherapy, Manual Therapy, and General Practitioner Care For Neck Pain: Economic Evaluation Alongside A Randomised Control Trial. BMJ 2005; 326: 911-917.
  4. Ornish, Dean. Avoiding Revascularization with Lifestyle Changes: The Multicenter Lifestyle Demonstration Project. Am J Cardiol 1998;82:72T–76T.
  5. Seely D, Herman P. Presented at 2010 AANP Conference. Model Whole Practice Study Finds Naturopathic Care Effective, Cost Saving for Canadian Employer. Unpublished. http://theintegratorblog.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=682&Itemid=189
  6. Herman PM, Szczurko O, Cooley K, Mills EJ. Cost-effectiveness of naturopathic care for chronic low back pain. Altern Ther Health Med. 2008 Mar-Apr;14(2):32-9.
  7. Williamson DF. Primary prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus by lifestyle intervention: implications for health policy. Ann Intern Med 2004; 140(11):951-7.
  8. Kahn, Richard. The Impact of Prevention on Reducing the Burden of Cardiovascular Disease. Circulation 2008, 118:576-585.
  9. Woolf, Steeve.  A Closer Look at the Economic Argument for Disease Prevention. JAMA 2009; 301 (5) 356-3.
  10. Hernan WH. Costs associated with the primary prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the diabetes prevention program. Diabetes Care. 2003; 26(1):36-47.
  11. Lind, Bonnie K. et al: Comparison of Health Care Expenditures Among Insured Users and Nonusers of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Washington State: A Cost Minimization Analysis. J Alternative and Complementary Med 2010; 16: 411-417.
  12. Sarnat, Richard L.  et al. Clinical Utilization and Cost Outcomes From and Integrative Medicine Independent Physician Association: An Additional 3- Year Update. J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2007; 30: 263-269.
  13. http://www.ccnm.edu/sites/ccnm/files/pdfs/news_events/press_releases/attitudes_towards.pdf
  14. Stewart D. Utilization, Patient Satisfaction, and Cost Implications of Acupuncture, Massage, and Naturopathic Medicine As Covered Health Benefits; A Comparison of Two Delivery Models. Alternative Therapies in Health & Med. 2001.

DISCLAIMER: Dr. Kate Naumes holds a Doctorate in Naturopathy and a Certificate in Midwifery from Bastyr University. The state of Texas does not license Naturopathic Doctors. As such, she holds her license in California and acts in Texas as a wellness consultant, not as a physician.

Eco-friendly, holistic health loving mom’s checklist

30 Jan

 

The lovely blog tinydallas has a regularly occurring “moms we love” segment.

“Not too long ago, Dr. Kate Naumes weighed in with a post on how to keep the kiddos healthy during flu season using natural remedies. Dr. Naumes is a naturopathic doctor that works with women and children, showing them how to use various holistic methods to maintain and improve their health. I’ve always been intrigued by (and a big believer in) the practice of holistic medicine and was eager to learn more about this former Oregonian, now an Oak Cliff resident. So without further adieu, here’s a peek into her world….”

Read more here

Also, if you haven’t checked out this blog and you live in DFW it is a delight to read.  I count myself lucky to be included in its posts.  Thank you tinydallas.

Wellness Dollars and Cents

2 Jun

Most Americans have a disease-focused outlook on health, not thinking much about their health until something goes wrong. The World Health Organization defines health as a “state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity” but we tend to think of wellness as a luxury to be sought after when all the bills are paid, the kids are in bed, the house is clean, etc. Actually, it turns out good health is a great investment. One Harvard Medical School study found that the return on one of their preventive measures was $36 for every dollar spent.

When we’re not sleeping well, when we’re overweight, when we’re not eating right, we grossly underestimate the cost of those lifestyle choices on our longterm health and our pocketbook. Many insurance companies and company health plans exacerbate the situation by often failing to cover preventative measures like botanical remedies, nutritional counseling, massage, acupuncture and exercise programs that would save people and governments money in the long run.

Schedule an appointment today to discuss your wellness path and start saving money.

Meat

4 May

photo: Colorado Luis

“Consumers may be weary of hearing about what’s wrong with their meat — from the calories to the E. coli to its heart unfriendliness. Unfortunately, there’s another bit of bad news: Nearly a quarter of the meat and poultry sold in U.S. supermarkets is infected with nasty drug-resistant bacteria, too…”  Read more at NPR

There is good news though. Right here in Texas we can enjoy pastured chicken and grass-fed beef and lamb. These natural meats are raised without added hormones, antibiotics or feed stimulants.

Wanting more support on sifting through this information?  Have questions about eating meat after a diagnosis of high-cholesterol or hypertension? Wanting to lose weight and wondering how eating meat fits into that goal? Please email frontdesk.naumes.nd@gmail.com to schedule an appointment or inquire about services.

Check out one of my book recommendations: Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan

Oak Cliff Farm Box

18 Sep

We have just found a great way to get a large box full of quality, healthy, seasonal and affordable vegetables and fruits here in Dallas.

Take a look: Urban Acres