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Moms and Exhaustion

19 Jul

Welcome our new holistic nutritionist, Carina Parikh

3 Jul
Holistic Nutritionist, Carina Parikh,  MScN, MSiMR

Holistic Nutritionist, Carina Parikh, MScN, MSiMR

Carina Parikh, MScN, MSiMR is joining the practice July 13th as our new Holistic Nutritionist. We are so excited to have Carina! She holds a Masters of Science in Nutrition and a Masters of Science in Integrative Medicine Research from National College of Natural Medicine – an accredited Medical School in Naturopathic and Classical Chinese Medicine located in Portland, Oregon.

Needless to say, Carina knows healthy food in a really deep wayCarina will be available for highly tailored meal planning via in-office Nutritional Counseling Visits, in-home Pantry Clean Outs as well as Guided Grocery Shopping Visits with you at your local Dallas area Whole Foods, Central Market, or Green Grocer.

As always, we appreciate you inviting us on your personal health journey and we’ll see you soon!

A Holistic Approach to Depression

28 Feb


Depression is a medical illness that involves the mind and body.  Feelings of hopelessness, chronic apathy, and reduced ability to experience pleasure in life are some of the debilitating symptoms of depression.   Chronic depression can interfere with a person’s work and social life, appetite, sleep, and energy level, and has also been noted to increase risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease, especially among women.
  • Imbalances in certain hormones may underlie depression, particularly when stress and obesity are present.
  • Inadequate amounts of certain vitamins, minerals, amino acids, and essential fats can predispose to chronic depression.
  • Certain amino acids are crucial source material for the production of brain neurotransmitters and mood regulation.
  • Malabsorption in celiac disease may interfere with mood regulating neurotransmitters and nutrients such as vitamin B12.
  • Studies shower a higher incidence of depression in those with celiac’s disease compared to those without the disorder.
  • Many with depression also suffer from thyroid hormone imbalances
  • Overexposure to certain heavy metals have been shown to induce  depression.
  • Pre-menstrual and post-menopausal hormone imbalances contribute to mood swings in many women.
  • Deficient omega-3 fatty acids can contribute to depression, particularly in alcoholics and post-partum women.
  • Imbalances in melatonin can result in depression.
  • Depression in men seems to correlate with a drop in testosterone seen with aging.
  • Depression appears to predispose individuals to immune hypersensitivity to various food and environmental allergens.
  • Bacterial overgrowth in the small bowel can impair absorption of key nutrients involved in mood regulation.
The beauty of Naturopathic Care is that it can address each of these possible contributors to depression.   Working with Dr. Naumes to create an individualized approach using nutrition, exercise, appropriate laboratory testing (via your primary care physician), botanical remedies, and supplementation to replete or correct imbalances, the body can function at a more optimal level.   Making appropriate lifestyle changes is often of upmost importance.   Dr. Naumes encourages her clients to work closely with a qualified counselor/therapist.

The Power of Family Dinner

29 Jun

Power of Family Dinner

As part of our continuing pursuit in finding that elusive balance, I wanted to touch on the importance of family dinners. The good news is that research shows that adolescents and parents perceive family meals positively. It looks as though family meals could be a useful mechanism for enhancing family togetherness. They’re also good platforms for parents to model behaviors that they would like their children to emulate.

For younger kids, the benefits are further motivating… Wouldn’t we all love to enjoy our kids again, instilling in them more grace and courtesy as we prepare them for the privilege of an enjoyable dinner at a restaurant? (Getting them to eat more fresh more fruits and vegetables would be nice too.)

Read on for some tips for creating that vital ritual of family dinner:

Before dinner:

  • Set a regular dinnertime.
  • Take on fewer activities if these are getting the way of family dinner.
  • Prepare (or pick up pre-made) food to eat together at home.
  • Include children in setting the table (a toddler placemat can empower littles to set the table).
  • Turn off the TV and music and remove technology/phones/tablets from the table.
  • Light a candle and/or dim the lights.
  • Say a prayer or express gratitude for your time together and for the food.

To read more of Dr. Naumes’ posts head over to D-Moms Blog.

Cultivating Couple Time

19 Feb

Cultivating Couple Time

 

As you come down off your Valentine’s Day high this week, let’s talk about a few ways to consistently cultivate and strengthen your relationship with your spouse. If you happen to have a marriage like mine, nothing works better for us than turning on music – our favorite right now is some nights by fun! – and dancing for 5 minutes.  We’ve also appreciated the benefits of creating a family mission statement.

Read more of Dr. Naumes’ post over at D-Magazines DMoms Blog for some other ideas you might implement to improve your health, happiness, and stress levels for years to come!

 

Girl Time Might be the Healthiest Thing You do all Month

18 Dec

 

 

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The hectic holiday schedule affords many opportunities to gather with family and friends. While it’s easy to be overwhelmed by the stress of the season, taking time to relax with friends turns out to be vital for good health. This week, we’ll talk about the whole-body benefits of good friendships. Research shows that people who have strong social connections also have:

  • Better cardiovascular health
  • Lower risk of colds and depression
  • Lower overall stress and healthier ways of coping with stress
  • A stronger immune system
  • Better insulin regulation

Good friendships also provide long-term brain benefits. A study from the Harvard School of Public Health of adults aged 65+ found that social interactions keep the brain sharp in later life.

While difficult relationships with friends and family members have been linked to negative health effects, positive relationships give people a greater sense of happiness and well-being. Numerous studies show that happy people live longer, healthier lives. Momentary pleasures, such as laughing with a dear friend, can improve overall happiness levels, which include a deep sense of life satisfaction, optimism, positive emotions, and the absence of negative emotions.

Read more of Dr. Naumes’ post over at D-Magazines D-Moms Blog