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Welcome our new holistic nutritionist, Carina Parikh

3 Jul
Holistic Nutritionist, Carina Parikh,  MScN, MSiMR

Holistic Nutritionist, Carina Parikh, MScN, MSiMR

Carina Parikh, MScN, MSiMR is joining the practice July 13th as our new Holistic Nutritionist. We are so excited to have Carina! She holds a Masters of Science in Nutrition and a Masters of Science in Integrative Medicine Research from National College of Natural Medicine – an accredited Medical School in Naturopathic and Classical Chinese Medicine located in Portland, Oregon.

Needless to say, Carina knows healthy food in a really deep wayCarina will be available for highly tailored meal planning via in-office Nutritional Counseling Visits, in-home Pantry Clean Outs as well as Guided Grocery Shopping Visits with you at your local Dallas area Whole Foods, Central Market, or Green Grocer.

As always, we appreciate you inviting us on your personal health journey and we’ll see you soon!

Organic Garden

18 Aug

“A consecrated space experientially reminds you that there is much more to life than you think”  -Sadhguru

Digging in the Dirt

We here at Dr. Kate Naumes || Holistic Wellness have exciting news. We are planting an organic laboratory garden and will also be offering cooking classes for kids and adults in which we use food from our garden in our classes! Steve, James and their crew at Eat The Yard are helping us to get going.

We want to lead and support our clients to nurture themselves – physically, emotionally, and spiritually – so that our clients have the freedom to be their best selves. We believe that healthy women are the hub of a healthy world, and as healthier women we bring forth healthier and happier generations. What better way to support our clients to exercise, relax, and connect to the earth than through gardening and cooking?

So, on Day 1 of our garden project, we amended the soil in the backyard so that the soil could support the growth of healthy plants. Our soil was depleted. So depleted in fact, that we could not have grown healthy plants. The first day was spent getting rid of as much of the trash as possible and then digging out 6-12 inches of yucky dirt.

Mulching

Day 2 was focused on replenishing the soil. What was our basic plan for amending the soil?  The main plantings areas were filled with compost from Living Earth, a professional bedding mix – aka ‘landscape mix’ – including green sand, topsoil, expanded shale and sharp sand. Next, a layer of wood chips were laid down to help hold in moisture and eventually degrade into healthy soil.  Lastly, the entire backyard was inoculated with compost tea, rock dust, and oyster mushroom spores.

Watering

I can appreciate the loose analogy between improving our soil and improving our own internal  gastrointestinal and detoxification systems health. Sometimes our gastrointestinal and detoxification systems are so out of balance that we have to start with a detox (i.e remove the top 6-12 inches of yucky soil). Then we need to rebuild good GI health with the proper combination and timing of digestive enzymes (mushroom spores), probiotics (compost tea), healthy clean whole foods (compost & landscape mix), while replenishing with minerals (rock dust) and electrolytes (wood chips).

In short, if we remove the unhealthy things from our bodies/soil and put good stuff into our bodies/gardens it becomes possible to actually get good stuff back!  Can’t wait to share our organic laboratory garden and cooking classes!  

flowers

Kids Summer Organic Gluten-free Dinner Camp with Dr. Naumes

9 Aug

Cooking Camp

We will base our dinners on whole foods organic gluten-free ingredients.  Each day we will prep, cook, clean, set the table, and then eat the meal we prepared together.

When: Monday August 18th – Friday August 21st 2-5pm

Ages: 7-12

Please email for pricing and location!

Local Healthy Food Field Trip in Dallas!

24 Jun

yummy salad

A valued and long term client shared the following invaluable information with us. Please enjoy!

Years ago, I remember visiting Central Market for the first time and feeling intimidated to see such a variety of unfamiliar food.  This experience sparked an interest in visting a number of local farmer’s markets, and really learning about ingredients and where our food comes from. Nearly a decade has passed and I still love discovering new ingredients and visiting with local farmers who have a passion for the food they offer.
On a recent trip to Hood River, Oregon, my wife and I enjoyed a day touring a local “Fruit Loop” which included a number of local farms.  The drive included farms with apples, cherries and peaches in season, a lavender farm, and an alpaca farm/yarn shop where they breed Alpacas and sell handspun yarn from the fleece.
In that spirit, I’d like to share a few destinations local to the North Dallas area that would make for a fun “food field trip” one Saturday. You’ll want to bring along an ice chest!
— 
Start in Plano at the Lucky Layla Farm store at Lavon Farms.  Discover raw, unpasteurized cow’s milk, drinkable yogurts, handcrafted cheeses, butter and caramel milk.
Lavon Farms: http://www.lavonfarms.com, 3721 N. Jupiter Rd
Mon-Sat 9-6, 972-423-8080
 —
Continue North to McKinney to visit Matt at Local Yocal and discover Wagyu steak at its best! Consider signing up for a Steak 101 class to learn where the various cuts of steak come from, how meat is aged, and best of all how to cook it to perfection yourself!  Come hungry for lunch because in the class you’ll sample each cut of steak cooked with wood charcoal on an outdoor pit.
Local Yocal: http://www.localyocalfarmtomarket.com, 213 N Tennessee St.
Mon-Sat 8-6, 469-952-3838
 —
From McKinney, find FM-543/Weston Rd off of US-75 and enjoy the drive to Weston, Texas, the oldest town in Collin County. Visit Steve at Texas Range Honey for a taste of raw unfiltered varietal honeys and farm fresh eggs. Steve is very passionate about both honey and his chickens!
Texas Range Honey: http://rangehoney.com, 116 Main Street
Saturdays 9am-1pm972-567-2542
 —
The final stop to Hidden Valley Dairy in Argyle is quite a bit of a drive, though a very scenic one. From Weston, go north on FM-543 and make a left on FM-455. Follow FM-455 across Lake Ray Roberts spillway to I-35. Take I-35 south and follow the split to the right, I-35W and take Crawford Road/Robson Ranch Road exit, turn left, go under I-35W, and take the first right onto Taylor Road. At the end of Taylor Road, turn Left on Old Justin Road. Hidden Valley Dairy will be on your left. Trey & Judy’s specialty is raw goat’s milk, including a wide variety of scented goat milk products that Judy makes herself.  They often have a number of other local and seasonal offerings you may be interested in.  Make sure to check out the goats while you’re there!
Hidden Valley Dairy: http://www.hiddenvalleydairy.com, 402 Old Justin Rd.
M-W-F 10:30am-6:00pm, Sat 12:00-6:00pm469-442-7775
 —
We love supporting local farmers, and we’re sure there’s a lot more out there to discover.  We hope you’ll check these farmers out, and if there are others you’d like to share please let us know and we’ll pay them a visit!

Interview on CW33’s Dallas Closeup

4 Mar

Organic Garden Update

28 Nov

photo by Thejaswi

Here is an update on my search for less expensive clean food.  Our compost bin and worm bin have been hours of fun for our son. Plus I feel much better about turning our food waste into organic soil instead of more trash for the landfill.

Most compost bins are plastic and that didn’t feel right to me.  Ours is a terra cotta composter with a hinged wooden lid.   Oak Cliff Organics guided us with the following:

  • Dried leaves are a good source of  brown, or carbon based material
  • Greens include: pre cooked fruit and veggie scraps, egg shells, used tea bags and coffee grounds
  • We mix what is in the pot weekly, which helps it decompose.  In about 3 months we shouldn’t be able to identify anything in the pot and it is ready to put in our garden.

We also have a terra cotta worm bin.  The little red wigglers come up and feed after we put our food scraps in the bin. We can add crushed eggs shells, tea bags and coffee grounds here too. In about eight weeks the soil will be considered vermicompost and ready to harvest and put in our garden. Oak Cliff Organics will be coming by to give us a lesson in harvesting our worms!

Organic Vegetable Garden

12 Oct

I'm watering!

As of this week, I now have an organic vegetable and herb garden on my 6×4 patio. It’s not hard to make happen and there are a lot of great reasons to do so:

1) Those thirsty plants provide a daily reminder to get outside, move around, smell fresh air and put my hands in the dirt.

2) The food is as fresh as it gets. Do we want a salad tonight? Lots of different lettuces, kale, beets, and more to choose from.

3) It’s also as local as it gets, we open the door and just take exactly what we need – nothing goes to waste.

4) The plant diversity is improving our ecosystem – the flowers accompanying the plants attract pollinators (bees).

5) A little playground for my son to spend time, learn about where his food comes from and get excited about vegetables. But it goes further than that. “Child advocacy expert Richard Louv directly links the lack of nature in the lives of today’s wired generation—he calls it nature-deficit—to some of the most disturbing childhood trends, such as the rises in obesity, attention disorders, and depression.” Louv brings together “a new and growing body of research indicating that direct exposure to nature is essential for healthy childhood development and for the physical and emotional health of children and adults.” And he’s got specific solutions, for example: “Invite native flora and fauna into your life. Maintain a birdbath. Replace part of your lawn with native plants. Build a bat house. For backyard suggestions, plus links to information about attracting wildlife to apartments and townhouses, see the National Audubon Society’s “Invitation to a Healthy Yard,” at http://www.audubonathome.org/yard”.

Yum!

Gluten-Free Living

16 Sep

Excerpt from SMU’s The Daily Campus:

Forced to live gluten free 

By Bethany Suba
Published: Friday, September 16, 2011

Dr. Kate Naumes was diagnosed with celiac disease the summer after her senior year of college.She had struggled most of her young adult life with fatigue, anemia and a lot of vague symptoms that her primary care doctor could not identify with a specific disease.

She ended up leaving school on a medical leave of absence because her health was so poor.

Once she was diagnosed with celiac disease her life did a complete 360.

“The first couple of years were really challenging because at first I was told that I couldn’t eat wheat,” Dr. Naumes said.

Celiac disease is a condition where the immune system responds abnormally to gluten.

Gluten is found in wheat, rye, barley and a multitude of prepared foods.

“Celiac disease can occur in people of any age and it affects both genders,” Dr. Naumes said.

Symptoms of celiac disease are an atrophy of intestines, weight loss, vitamin deficiencies or low iron or vitamin D….

Follow these links to read more about living gluten free and Gluten Free Recipes & Tips

Healthy & Easy Finger-Foods for Toddlers

8 Sep

This is a list of my favorite foods that I have been feeding my, almost-13-month-old, son.  I hope you find them helpful.

All Organic, All Easy, All Gluten-Free:

1.  Steamed Carrots
2.  Baked Sweet Potato with Coconut Butter
3.  Free-Range Chicken from Urban Acres, Broccoli, Brown Rice with Wheat-free Tamari and Sesame Oil
4.  Sautéed Zucchini and Squash
5.  2 Egg Yolks (just the yellow part!), fried with pepper
6.  Purple Cabbage sautéed with Ginger and Wheat-free Tamari
7.  Steamed Beets
8.  Bite-sized banana, watermellon, cantelope, and peaches
9.  Apple Sauce with Triple Berry Probiotic Therapeutic Foods
10.  Nitschke Natural ground beef with cumin & coriander

More about my food philosophy

Herbal Home Remedies for Kids

24 Aug


Today Wednesday August 24th, 2011 7:00pm
location: Call 415.754.8305

Come learn simple and effective ways to nurture your little one during their time of need. We’ll cover common childhood ailments such as:
-bruises
-cold sores
-conjunctivitis
-cradle cap
-sore throat
-insect bites

$10
to signup call: 415.754.8305
or email: drnaumes@gmail.com

Read more about Herbal First Aid Kits here

Meat

4 May

photo: Colorado Luis

“Consumers may be weary of hearing about what’s wrong with their meat — from the calories to the E. coli to its heart unfriendliness. Unfortunately, there’s another bit of bad news: Nearly a quarter of the meat and poultry sold in U.S. supermarkets is infected with nasty drug-resistant bacteria, too…”  Read more at NPR

There is good news though. Right here in Texas we can enjoy pastured chicken and grass-fed beef and lamb. These natural meats are raised without added hormones, antibiotics or feed stimulants.

Wanting more support on sifting through this information?  Have questions about eating meat after a diagnosis of high-cholesterol or hypertension? Wanting to lose weight and wondering how eating meat fits into that goal? Please email frontdesk.naumes.nd@gmail.com to schedule an appointment or inquire about services.

Check out one of my book recommendations: Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan

Oak Cliff Farm Box

18 Sep

We have just found a great way to get a large box full of quality, healthy, seasonal and affordable vegetables and fruits here in Dallas.

Take a look: Urban Acres