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Kids Summer Organic Gluten-free Dinner Camp with Dr. Naumes

9 Aug

Cooking Camp

We will base our dinners on whole foods organic gluten-free ingredients.  Each day we will prep, cook, clean, set the table, and then eat the meal we prepared together.

When: Monday August 18th – Friday August 21st 2-5pm

Ages: 7-12

Please email for pricing and location!

A Holistic Approach to Depression

28 Feb


Depression is a medical illness that involves the mind and body.  Feelings of hopelessness, chronic apathy, and reduced ability to experience pleasure in life are some of the debilitating symptoms of depression.   Chronic depression can interfere with a person’s work and social life, appetite, sleep, and energy level, and has also been noted to increase risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease, especially among women.
  • Imbalances in certain hormones may underlie depression, particularly when stress and obesity are present.
  • Inadequate amounts of certain vitamins, minerals, amino acids, and essential fats can predispose to chronic depression.
  • Certain amino acids are crucial source material for the production of brain neurotransmitters and mood regulation.
  • Malabsorption in celiac disease may interfere with mood regulating neurotransmitters and nutrients such as vitamin B12.
  • Studies shower a higher incidence of depression in those with celiac’s disease compared to those without the disorder.
  • Many with depression also suffer from thyroid hormone imbalances
  • Overexposure to certain heavy metals have been shown to induce  depression.
  • Pre-menstrual and post-menopausal hormone imbalances contribute to mood swings in many women.
  • Deficient omega-3 fatty acids can contribute to depression, particularly in alcoholics and post-partum women.
  • Imbalances in melatonin can result in depression.
  • Depression in men seems to correlate with a drop in testosterone seen with aging.
  • Depression appears to predispose individuals to immune hypersensitivity to various food and environmental allergens.
  • Bacterial overgrowth in the small bowel can impair absorption of key nutrients involved in mood regulation.
The beauty of Naturopathic Care is that it can address each of these possible contributors to depression.   Working with Dr. Naumes to create an individualized approach using nutrition, exercise, appropriate laboratory testing (via your primary care physician), botanical remedies, and supplementation to replete or correct imbalances, the body can function at a more optimal level.   Making appropriate lifestyle changes is often of upmost importance.   Dr. Naumes encourages her clients to work closely with a qualified counselor/therapist.

Tips on Eating Healthy When You’re Eating Out

22 Mar

Eating Healthy When Eating Out

So you just walked in to that healthy new restaurant/juice bar/locally-sourced-what-have-you everyone’s been talking about. You comment to your dining companion how fortunate we are to have these establishments popping up here in Dallas! Since, everything is local, organic, freshly made (or at least not processed), it must all be good for you, right?

Not necessarily…

If you’re not a 20 year old in perfect health, the answer may be more nuanced that you might think. Why? Because the very same foods travel through our very different bodies in unique ways due to our specific hormonal and metabolic makeups. So yes, as a general guideline for eating healthy, I wholeheartedly agree with author Michael Pollen’s memorable quote “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” But if you have have a disease, are having pregnancy related difficulties, have diabetes, are overweight, or if your body is out of balance and you have a health problem trying to solve it on your own with the aid of the latest diet trend may not have the intended effect that you desire.

Read more of Dr. Naumes’ post over at D-Magazine’s D-Moms Blog.

Gluten-Free Living

16 Sep

Excerpt from SMU’s The Daily Campus:

Forced to live gluten free 

By Bethany Suba
Published: Friday, September 16, 2011

Dr. Kate Naumes was diagnosed with celiac disease the summer after her senior year of college.She had struggled most of her young adult life with fatigue, anemia and a lot of vague symptoms that her primary care doctor could not identify with a specific disease.

She ended up leaving school on a medical leave of absence because her health was so poor.

Once she was diagnosed with celiac disease her life did a complete 360.

“The first couple of years were really challenging because at first I was told that I couldn’t eat wheat,” Dr. Naumes said.

Celiac disease is a condition where the immune system responds abnormally to gluten.

Gluten is found in wheat, rye, barley and a multitude of prepared foods.

“Celiac disease can occur in people of any age and it affects both genders,” Dr. Naumes said.

Symptoms of celiac disease are an atrophy of intestines, weight loss, vitamin deficiencies or low iron or vitamin D….

Follow these links to read more about living gluten free and Gluten Free Recipes & Tips