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Organic Garden

18 Aug

“A consecrated space experientially reminds you that there is much more to life than you think”  -Sadhguru

Digging in the Dirt

We here at Dr. Kate Naumes || Holistic Wellness have exciting news. We are planting an organic laboratory garden and will also be offering cooking classes for kids and adults in which we use food from our garden in our classes! Steve, James and their crew at Eat The Yard are helping us to get going.

We want to lead and support our clients to nurture themselves – physically, emotionally, and spiritually – so that our clients have the freedom to be their best selves. We believe that healthy women are the hub of a healthy world, and as healthier women we bring forth healthier and happier generations. What better way to support our clients to exercise, relax, and connect to the earth than through gardening and cooking?

So, on Day 1 of our garden project, we amended the soil in the backyard so that the soil could support the growth of healthy plants. Our soil was depleted. So depleted in fact, that we could not have grown healthy plants. The first day was spent getting rid of as much of the trash as possible and then digging out 6-12 inches of yucky dirt.

Mulching

Day 2 was focused on replenishing the soil. What was our basic plan for amending the soil?  The main plantings areas were filled with compost from Living Earth, a professional bedding mix – aka ‘landscape mix’ – including green sand, topsoil, expanded shale and sharp sand. Next, a layer of wood chips were laid down to help hold in moisture and eventually degrade into healthy soil.  Lastly, the entire backyard was inoculated with compost tea, rock dust, and oyster mushroom spores.

Watering

I can appreciate the loose analogy between improving our soil and improving our own internal  gastrointestinal and detoxification systems health. Sometimes our gastrointestinal and detoxification systems are so out of balance that we have to start with a detox (i.e remove the top 6-12 inches of yucky soil). Then we need to rebuild good GI health with the proper combination and timing of digestive enzymes (mushroom spores), probiotics (compost tea), healthy clean whole foods (compost & landscape mix), while replenishing with minerals (rock dust) and electrolytes (wood chips).

In short, if we remove the unhealthy things from our bodies/soil and put good stuff into our bodies/gardens it becomes possible to actually get good stuff back!  Can’t wait to share our organic laboratory garden and cooking classes!  

flowers

Interview on CW33’s Dallas Closeup

4 Mar

Organic Garden Update

28 Nov

photo by Thejaswi

Here is an update on my search for less expensive clean food.  Our compost bin and worm bin have been hours of fun for our son. Plus I feel much better about turning our food waste into organic soil instead of more trash for the landfill.

Most compost bins are plastic and that didn’t feel right to me.  Ours is a terra cotta composter with a hinged wooden lid.   Oak Cliff Organics guided us with the following:

  • Dried leaves are a good source of  brown, or carbon based material
  • Greens include: pre cooked fruit and veggie scraps, egg shells, used tea bags and coffee grounds
  • We mix what is in the pot weekly, which helps it decompose.  In about 3 months we shouldn’t be able to identify anything in the pot and it is ready to put in our garden.

We also have a terra cotta worm bin.  The little red wigglers come up and feed after we put our food scraps in the bin. We can add crushed eggs shells, tea bags and coffee grounds here too. In about eight weeks the soil will be considered vermicompost and ready to harvest and put in our garden. Oak Cliff Organics will be coming by to give us a lesson in harvesting our worms!

Organic Vegetable Garden

12 Oct

I'm watering!

As of this week, I now have an organic vegetable and herb garden on my 6×4 patio. It’s not hard to make happen and there are a lot of great reasons to do so:

1) Those thirsty plants provide a daily reminder to get outside, move around, smell fresh air and put my hands in the dirt.

2) The food is as fresh as it gets. Do we want a salad tonight? Lots of different lettuces, kale, beets, and more to choose from.

3) It’s also as local as it gets, we open the door and just take exactly what we need – nothing goes to waste.

4) The plant diversity is improving our ecosystem – the flowers accompanying the plants attract pollinators (bees).

5) A little playground for my son to spend time, learn about where his food comes from and get excited about vegetables. But it goes further than that. “Child advocacy expert Richard Louv directly links the lack of nature in the lives of today’s wired generation—he calls it nature-deficit—to some of the most disturbing childhood trends, such as the rises in obesity, attention disorders, and depression.” Louv brings together “a new and growing body of research indicating that direct exposure to nature is essential for healthy childhood development and for the physical and emotional health of children and adults.” And he’s got specific solutions, for example: “Invite native flora and fauna into your life. Maintain a birdbath. Replace part of your lawn with native plants. Build a bat house. For backyard suggestions, plus links to information about attracting wildlife to apartments and townhouses, see the National Audubon Society’s “Invitation to a Healthy Yard,” at http://www.audubonathome.org/yard”.

Yum!