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5 Things Restaurants Don’t Want You To Know About Their Food

22 Jul
Holistic Nutritionist, Carina Parikh,  MScN, MSiMR

Holistic Nutritionist, Carina Parikh, MScN, MSiMR

  1. There is a LOT of butter involved. And not small amounts of high quality, grass fed butter, but rather a ton of low-quality butter from cows that are likely treated with hormones and/or antibiotics. Butter is added to proteins, vegetables, sauces, and desserts to enhance the flavor and make things creamier.
  2. They add more salt than you would guess. Salt is a natural preservative and a flavor enhancer. Most restaurants are not concerned with their diners looking to watch their sodium levels, but rather on making sure the customers love the food and think it tastes great. Salt helps with this. Steaks are salted before cooked, vegetables are blanched in salt water, and a lot of salt finds its way into soups and sauces. Some salt is better than others. Table salt is heavily refined and processed with added chemicals, while unrefined sea salts are harvested by hand and have greater mineral content, and thus lower sodium. These sea salts don’t have added ingredients either. However, chances are that the restaurants are not using the more expensive, higher quality sea salts.
  3. They cook at very high heat. High temperatures are necessary to get the perfect sear on a steak, or cook vegetables fast enough to keep them from getting mushy. Using this high heat is generally impractical at home, which is why you most likely cannot get a perfect sear at home the way you do at a high end restaurant or steak house. The problem with this ultra high heat cooking is that it produces Advanced Glycation End-products, or AGEs, that research shows to be carcinogenic.
  4. You can almost always bet that your steak is grain-fed. Grassfed cows have less fat, and so the steak cuts lack that fat marbling that makes your steak so flavorful. Even if restaurants say that their steak is grassfed, it is likely grain-finished to add in that fat at the end. Now, a high end steak house is still going to have higher quality cuts of meats than fast food or more mediocre restaurants, generally using USDA prime beef, but that does not mean that nutritional value is necessarily a lot better.
  5. Chefs tend to go heavy on the cream. Cream adds flavor and richness to sauces and soups. When you add this to all the butter used to cook, you end up consuming a lot of saturated fat in one sitting, and paying a lot more money for it than you would at a lower end restaurant! Again, it is unlikely that this cream is organic or from grassfed cows, meaning that you are probably consuming dairy that contains antibiotics or synthetic hormones.

THE TAKEAWAY: The best way to ensure that you get healthy meals into your routine is to eat at home. You do not have to spend an hour each night preparing dinner to make a nutritious meal. In our practice here at Holistic Wellness, we provide ways of cooking healthy food at home that will empower you to take charge of the health of you and your family. Schedule a nutritional consult with me and let us help you optimize your health!

The connection between Acne, Birth Control, Weight Loss, & Painful Menstrual Cycles

21 Jul

Welcome our new holistic nutritionist, Carina Parikh

3 Jul
Holistic Nutritionist, Carina Parikh,  MScN, MSiMR

Holistic Nutritionist, Carina Parikh, MScN, MSiMR

Carina Parikh, MScN, MSiMR is joining the practice July 13th as our new Holistic Nutritionist. We are so excited to have Carina! She holds a Masters of Science in Nutrition and a Masters of Science in Integrative Medicine Research from National College of Natural Medicine – an accredited Medical School in Naturopathic and Classical Chinese Medicine located in Portland, Oregon.

Needless to say, Carina knows healthy food in a really deep wayCarina will be available for highly tailored meal planning via in-office Nutritional Counseling Visits, in-home Pantry Clean Outs as well as Guided Grocery Shopping Visits with you at your local Dallas area Whole Foods, Central Market, or Green Grocer.

As always, we appreciate you inviting us on your personal health journey and we’ll see you soon!

The Sleep/Weight Loss Connection

4 Dec

Sleep/Weight Loss Connection

 

This month, we’ll talk about the effects that sleeping more, getting adequate vitamin D, and spending time with friends can have on your health. We’ll finish up the year with a look at the importance of Naturopathic care.

This week we’re going to walk through the very real benefits of getting shut eye (and what happens when we don’t get it). Over and over again in my practice, I find that the main reasons moms are not getting enough sleep typically involve one or more of the following:

  • a lack of understanding of the importance of sleep.
  • inadequate scheduling (not making shut-eye a priority).
  • insomnia.
  • anxiety.
  • sleep interruptions from little ones not sleeping well.

Let’s start with sleep and fat loss. I prefer to focus on fat loss with its emphasis on healthy body composition (ideal body fat and adequate muscle mass) rather than weight loss (which too often focuses on a number on the scale).

Read more of Dr. Naumes’ post over at D-Magazine’s D-Moms Blog.

Optimizing Water Intake

2 Dec

My hope this week is that during the holidays when you want to grab that second cup of coffee or that third glass of holiday cheer, you’ll think about choosing a glass of filtered water to help make you a better you!  And if you need more help making these habits a reality in your life, don’t hesitate to get help making it happen.

  • At least half of your daily fluid should come from water. More is fine—up to 100% of your daily beverage needs.
  • About one-third (or about three to four cups) can come from unsweetened organic coffee or tea. If you flavor your coffee or tea with a lot of sugar, cream, or whole milk, then drinking less would help manage weight. If you don’t drink coffee or tea, choose water instead to make up this one-third.
  • Harvard School of Public Health says milk can make up another 20 percent, or about two eight-ounce glasses. Less is my suggestion, just make sure you get your calcium from another source.  As an aside, dark leafy greens or dried beans, have varying amounts of absorbable calcium. Calcium supplements often contain vitamin D; taking calcium paired with vitamin D seems to be more beneficial for bone health than taking calcium alone.
  • A small glass (four ounces) of 100% organic unsweetened fruit juice OR no more than one to two alcoholic drinks for men or no more than one for women. (That means no alcohol at night ladies if you had orange juice at breakfast. )
  • Ideally, it’s best to completely cut out drinks sweetened with sugar, artificial sweeteners or high-fructose corn syrup.

REFERENCES

1. Popkin BM, Armstrong LE, Bray GM, Caballero B, Frei B, Willett WC. A new proposed guidance system for beverage consumption in the United States. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2006; 83:529-542.

2. Kuriyama S, Shimazu T, Ohmori K, Kikuchi N, Nakaya N, Nishino Y, Tsubono Y, Tsuji I. Green tea consumption and mortality due to cardiovascular disease, cancer, and all causes in Japan: the Ohsaki study. Journal of the American Medical Association. 2006; 296:1255-1265.

3. Van Dam RM, Willett WC, Manson JE, Hu FB. Coffee, caffeine, and risk of type 2 diabetes: a prospective cohort study in younger and middle-aged U.S. women. Diabetes Care. 2006; 29:398-403.

4. Starbucks beverage details: Mint Mocha Chip Frappuccino® blended coffee with Chocolate Whipped Cream. Accessed on March 28, 2009.

5. Institute of Medicine. Dietary Reference Intakes for Water, Potassium, Sodium, Chloride, and Sulfate. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press, 2004. Accessed on March 28, 2009.

Have you wondered whether Naturopathic Care is a good investment?

13 Sep

The Scientific Affairs Committee of the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians compiled data and released the following paper earlier this year:

Naturopathic Medicine:
A Key Part to Healing the Nation’s Financial Health Care Crisis

Increasing levels of chronic disease including: diabetes, heart disease, chronic pain, cancer and obesity, have created a multi-trillion dollar financial burden on the medical system. Naturopathic medicine may reduce the need for expensive conventional care by promoting health and decreasing the need for medical interventions over the long term.  Naturopathic doctors are primary care providers that treat acute and chronic conditions as well as address health promotion and disease prevention.

Naturopathic medicine costs less than conventional care.

  • Use of natural health products has the potential to improve health outcomes and reduce cost compared to conventional treatment by anywhere from 3.7- 73%. (1)
  • A 2006 University of Washington study found that in WA State, naturopathic care cost insurers $9.00 per enrollee vs. $686.00 for conventional care. (2)
  • Manual therapy cost less than primary care for neck pain and decreases recovery time, thereby also improving productivity. (3)
  • One year of a lifestyle intervention program (similar to that recommended by naturopathic physicians) for patients with coronary artery disease not only improved all health outcomes and reduced the need for surgery but also cost significantly less then conventional treatment ($7,000 vs $31,000 –$46,000). (4)
  • Naturopathic care, when used for reduction of cardiovascular risk factors (high blood pressure and cholesterol, for example) improved health and increased job productivity, and was determined to actually be a cost-saver for an employer. (5)
  • Naturopathic care used for chronic low back pain, not only cost less than a standard physical therapy regimen but also decreased absenteeism by up to 7 days in a worker’s year. (6)

Naturopathic medicine decreases the need for medical interventions by improving patient wellbeing, preventing disease and treating disease by improving health.

  • The naturopathic emphasis on prevention and health promotion saves lives and dollars. Lifestyle modification counseling prevented more cases of diabetes than drug treatment. (7)
  • It is estimated that if the current level of medical intervention continues the US will end up spending $9.5 trillion dollars over the next 30 years caring for cardiovascular disease, diabetes and congestive heart disease alone. By adding preventive strategies to improve patients’ health, total cost could be reduced approx. $904 billion or almost 10%. (8)
  • Although the initial cost of prevention and treatment using natural medicine is sometimes similar to conventional care the benefits gained by avoiding disease and their associated costs are invaluable and much preferred by patients. (9)
  • Patients who received intensive lifestyle modification and naturopathic therapy for type II diabetes improved all health scores (lipid levels, body fat percentage, etc.) and decreased medication requirements compared to those on standard therapy, in just one year. (10)

The use of naturopathic medicine decreases total medical expenditure.

  • Total expenditure on health care by insured complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) users is less than non-CAM users ($3,797 vs $4,153); this is an approximate $9.4 million saving for just 26,466 CAM-users (11)
  • Patients with the greatest disease burden, which tend to be the most expensive patients, show the most significant reduction in total medical expenditures when utilizing CAM.(12)
  • Naturopathic doctors are the bridge between alternative and conventional care and model true integrative care. Patients who receive care from an integrative primary care physician have reduced medical costs and need of medical intervention when compared to those receiving conventional primary care. (11)
  • Naturopathic care in Canada reduces the use of prescription medications by 53%. (13)
  • Reduction in drug prescriptions (61% less) and use of conventional medical care (55% less) are substantial among CAM users. (14)

References

  1. Kennedy, Deborah A. et al. Cost Effectiveness of Natural Health Products: A Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials. eCAM 2009; 6(3) 297-304 (5).
  2. Lafferty WE, et al. Insurance Coverage and Subsequent Utilization of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Providers. Am J Manag Care 2006; 12(7): 397-404 (7).
  3. Korthals-de Bos, Ingeborg B. C. Cost Effectiveness of Physiotherapy, Manual Therapy, and General Practitioner Care For Neck Pain: Economic Evaluation Alongside A Randomised Control Trial. BMJ 2005; 326: 911-917.
  4. Ornish, Dean. Avoiding Revascularization with Lifestyle Changes: The Multicenter Lifestyle Demonstration Project. Am J Cardiol 1998;82:72T–76T.
  5. Seely D, Herman P. Presented at 2010 AANP Conference. Model Whole Practice Study Finds Naturopathic Care Effective, Cost Saving for Canadian Employer. Unpublished. http://theintegratorblog.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=682&Itemid=189
  6. Herman PM, Szczurko O, Cooley K, Mills EJ. Cost-effectiveness of naturopathic care for chronic low back pain. Altern Ther Health Med. 2008 Mar-Apr;14(2):32-9.
  7. Williamson DF. Primary prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus by lifestyle intervention: implications for health policy. Ann Intern Med 2004; 140(11):951-7.
  8. Kahn, Richard. The Impact of Prevention on Reducing the Burden of Cardiovascular Disease. Circulation 2008, 118:576-585.
  9. Woolf, Steeve.  A Closer Look at the Economic Argument for Disease Prevention. JAMA 2009; 301 (5) 356-3.
  10. Hernan WH. Costs associated with the primary prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus in the diabetes prevention program. Diabetes Care. 2003; 26(1):36-47.
  11. Lind, Bonnie K. et al: Comparison of Health Care Expenditures Among Insured Users and Nonusers of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Washington State: A Cost Minimization Analysis. J Alternative and Complementary Med 2010; 16: 411-417.
  12. Sarnat, Richard L.  et al. Clinical Utilization and Cost Outcomes From and Integrative Medicine Independent Physician Association: An Additional 3- Year Update. J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2007; 30: 263-269.
  13. http://www.ccnm.edu/sites/ccnm/files/pdfs/news_events/press_releases/attitudes_towards.pdf
  14. Stewart D. Utilization, Patient Satisfaction, and Cost Implications of Acupuncture, Massage, and Naturopathic Medicine As Covered Health Benefits; A Comparison of Two Delivery Models. Alternative Therapies in Health & Med. 2001.

DISCLAIMER: Dr. Kate Naumes holds a Doctorate in Naturopathy and a Certificate in Midwifery from Bastyr University. The state of Texas does not license Naturopathic Doctors. As such, she holds her license in California and acts in Texas as a wellness consultant, not as a physician.

Quick, Effective Workouts

10 May

photo by Smabs Sputzer

Once my infant started sleeping through the night on a regular basis, I decided it was time to focus on regaining my pre-pregnancy strength and cardiovascular fitness. I can’t find the time to get to the gym right now and enjoy spending the extra time I do have with my son. So I searched high and low for workouts I could do at home, in the office, or outside with my child in tow.  I knew that I wanted something that didn’t require much equipment and these workouts require only a few dumbbells. With a combination of nutrition, exercise, visualization, and supplementation I find I’m feeling better and better each day.  Now I’m excited to be offering the following 6-packs to my clients!

What Type of Exercises Can You Expect?

The workouts I’m using are “circuit training” style, which is a system of exercising that maximizes fat-burning and cardiovascular training by keeping the heart rate and breathing up throughout the workout. Circuits are designed for maximum results in the least amount of time by moving from one exercise to the next with little rest in between. When you finish one complete round of the circuit, you begin again at the first exercise, until the specified time is up; in this case 15 minutes per circuit.

I hope you will enjoy them as much as I am.

Meat

4 May

photo: Colorado Luis

“Consumers may be weary of hearing about what’s wrong with their meat — from the calories to the E. coli to its heart unfriendliness. Unfortunately, there’s another bit of bad news: Nearly a quarter of the meat and poultry sold in U.S. supermarkets is infected with nasty drug-resistant bacteria, too…”  Read more at NPR

There is good news though. Right here in Texas we can enjoy pastured chicken and grass-fed beef and lamb. These natural meats are raised without added hormones, antibiotics or feed stimulants.

Wanting more support on sifting through this information?  Have questions about eating meat after a diagnosis of high-cholesterol or hypertension? Wanting to lose weight and wondering how eating meat fits into that goal? Please email frontdesk.naumes.nd@gmail.com to schedule an appointment or inquire about services.

Check out one of my book recommendations: Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan

Cancer and Overeating

22 Feb

Are you concerned about your breast cancer risk? Are you currently being treated for breast cancer? Are you a breast cancer survivor and want do to everything you can to prevent cancer reoccurrence?

“OVERWEIGHT women are more likely to develop breast cancer than lean ones. Why has been a mystery. But it is now less mysterious thanks to the work of Kevin Gardner, a researcher at America’s National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Maryland. Dr Gardner and his colleagues have found that processing calories affects the activity of BRCA1, a gene that encodes a well-known tumour-suppression protein. Mutations of this gene are strong predictors of breast and ovarian cancer—so strong that the gene’s DNA sequence is the subject of litigation in America about whether natural gene sequences can be patented, and thus the market in tests for these mutations cornered.”

I can help you minimize your breast cancer risk, provide holistic solutions to support you during cancer treatment, and help you prevent a reoccurrence. Please call today to schedule an appointment.

Read the original article over at the Economist.