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The Impact of Diet on Fertility

6 Feb

The Impact of Diet on Fertility

 

Most women start eating healthy around the 13th week of their pregnancy (after the nausea subsides), but for the most enjoyable pregnancy and the healthiest baby, I encourage my clients to start improving their nutrition at least four months before conception. This week I want to talk about the importance of food and digestion as it relates to preparing for conception and maximizing fertility.

How do you do that, you say? The best meals for a typical woman trying to get pregnant are meals that are organic whole-foods based and rich in protein, vitamins, and essential minerals. Whole foods are those that are made with simple and pure ingredients that are nutrient-dense and minimally processed. Over time, consuming healthy foods prepares your body for pregnancy, in part because it encourages ideal body composition, including a healthy amount of fat and muscle mass. (Too much or too little body fat can have negative effects on fertility.)

Additionally, the health of your digestive system contributes to the quality of your overall health because it determines how well you absorb nutrients from food. We’re used to thinking of bacteria as a bad thing, but friendly bacteria line your intestines and help to break down food to make the nutrients more available. This bacteria can also help deal with certain toxins present in foods, preventing damage to your body. To encourage friendly bacteria, consider taking a daily high-quality probiotic (because you can’t count on your yogurt to provide all of your probiotic needs). Furthermore, before getting pregnant, it’s a good idea to identify food sensitivities that may potentially trigger immune reactions during pregnancy.

Read more of Dr. Naumes’ post over at D-Magazines DMoms Blog

Allergies

14 Oct

Many people ask if I can help them with allergies for themselves and their children.  They are tired of taking Zyrtec, Claritin, and Benadryl on a regular basis. They want to understand why they have allergies.  Allergies is a term commonly applied to symptoms such as runny nose, conjunctivitis, asthma, hives or eczema that often occur in association with a season or exposure to certain foods or substances like pollens, pet dander, or dust. In fact, a wide variety of symptoms and systems may be involved in allergic or ‘sensitivity’ reactions that occur when a person’s immune system no longer tolerates seemingly benign substances. Although some allergies are ‘fixed’, correcting imbalances can minimize severity of symptoms. Other sensitivities may be reversed entirely with the proper attention.

  • Identifying specific allergenic foods and environmental substances is an important first step in resolving allergic symptoms.
  • It is important to take a look at digestive function.  Maldigestion and intestinal microflora imbalances can set the stage for chronic allergies, especially to foods.
  • Deficient cortisol in adrenal insufficiency can result in heightened allergic inflammatory responses. Confused?  What is this?  Ask Dr. Naumes to explain at your next visit.
  • Imbalances in key antioxidant nutrients can aggravate histamine reactions and impair immune function.
  • Inherited tendencies for allergic immune reactions is an underlying factor for many individuals with allergies.  Finding out what these are and correcting imbalances can improve quality of life.
  • Consider pre-conception care to learn about the effects of prenatal exposure to environmental toxins and how to minimize those exposures to decrease your child’s risk of allergies
The beauty of Naturopathic Care is that it can address each of these possible contributors to allergies.   Working with Dr. Naumes to create an individualized approach using nutrition, exercise, individualized laboratory testing (via appropriate avenues), botanical remedies, and supplementation to replete or correct imbalances, the body can function at a more optimal level.

Allergic to Wine!

29 Mar


One of life’s sadder statistics is that about 8% of people get sneezy and stuffy-headed after drinking wine. This mild allergic reaction is often blamed on preservative chemicals called sulphites, but they are responsible for only an eighth of cases.

To read more:
The oenophile’s lament
An explanation for a most unfortunate condition

Nov 25th 2010 | from the Economist

If you would like to better understand the impact of food on a particular health concerns you are having click below to make an appointment. Specific and appropriate dietary changes suggested by Dr. Naumes can drastically improve your health.